First Salad Bar Moment for Kids

Mission Nutrition











The New Lunch Box
Chef Ann Foundation has been supporting salad bar implementation as part of the reimbursable meal long before the USDA made fruit and vegetable servings mandatory at lunch. What do we love about them? Choice! Kids are empowered and part of the meal when they choose. And fresh! Fresh, whole foods create an immediate transformation to the familiar school meals. The new Lunch Box has a new home for all our salad bar tools – helping schools have their first salad bar moment. - The Chef Ann Foundation has teamed up with Skoop, a superfoods company committed to bringing the health benefits of superfoods to every American. Together we have launched Mission Nutrition: Fruit and Veggie Grants for Schools. These $2,500 grants assist you in exposing the students you serve to a diversity of fresh fruits and vegetables, expanding their palates, and encouraging increased consumption of fresh produce through fruit and vegetable samplings and lunchroom education experiences. Offering these events to all kids whether they bring or buy lunch requires additional funds. Mission Nutrition grants can help you fill that gap.

Who Can Apply  Any district or independent school participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is eligible to apply.

Grant Requirements

Grant funds must be used to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables; they may not be used for staff hours, transportation, collateral materials, or other programming costs.
Grant funds are intended for the additional food purchases required to offer your food education event to all students in the cafeteria at lunch, regardless whether they bought or brought their lunch.
The fruit and veggie samplings must be accompanied by a lunchroom education component such as a Rainbow Day at your salad bar, seasonal fruit and veggies tastings, vegetable recipe contests, chef-at-school events, farm-to-school events, or events of your own design. We provide more ideas for Lunchroom Education here on The Lunch Box.
Priority will be given to schools that have a free and reduced percentage of 50% or higher and that have made initial steps toward creating a healthier school lunch program with a focus on greater access to fruits and vegetables. 
We strongly encourage schools to use their Mission Nutrition funds to purchase locally produced fruits and vegetables when possible.
The application will close November 21, 2014.  Initial grants will be awarded by December 31, 2014. The fruit and vegetable sampling events must be completed by June 30, 2015.
See more at: http://www.chefannfoundation.org/news-media/the-lunch-line-blog/start-the-school-year-with-improved-tools-resource#sthash.KhhuUZdl.dpuf

When Art Meets Agriculture



 
 

Art & Nature Symposium
CULTIVATING CREATIVITY
Featuring:
Amy Lipton, ecoartspace
Peter Nadin, Old Field Farm
Andrea Reynosa, SkyDog Projects
Alan Sonfist, Environmental Artist
Linda Weintraub, Art Now Publications
Thursday, November 13, 2014
5:30pm–8:00pm
The Hort’s first annual Art & Nature Symposium focuses on the intersection of art and agriculture, and how both are used as catalysts for creative thought, environmental stewardship, and economic development. Join us for a reception and panel discussion with some of our most important artists, curators, and advocates as we explore the role art and culture play in cultivating and protecting our environment.



148 West 37th Street, 13th Floor | New York, NY 10018 | (212) 757-0915 


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The Horticultural Society of New York | 148 West 37th Street | 13th Floor | New York | NY | 10018

Good Food Guide Advice

Food Tank & James Beard Foundation Develops
 2014 Good Food Org Guide

The James Beard Foundation and Food Tank, along with a prestigious advisory group of food system experts, developed the first annual “Good Food Org Guide.” This definitive Guide highlights nonprofit organizations that are doing exemplary work in the United States in the areas of food and agriculture, nutrition and health, hunger and obesity, and food justice. Only nonprofit, scholarly, and municipal initiatives have been selected in order to spotlight efforts that are focused on community building and engagement, advocacy, and service.
The vision and objective of this annual publication is to focus attention on the dozens of nonprofit organizations (listed in alphabetical order, not ranked) who are working in fields, kitchens, classrooms, laboratories, businesses, town halls, and Congress to create a better food system. The list was determined by distinguished experts, including past recipients of the James Beard Leadership Award and food and agriculture leaders.
“We hope this guide will serve as a resource for chefs, farmers, students, advocates, and others to find the resources they need about the growing good food movement in the U.S.,” says Susan Ungaro, President of the James Beard Foundation.
This annual guide will be launched at the James Beard Food Conference on October 27, 2014 as the definitive guide to organizations—national and state-by-state—who are making an impact with their work.
These groups include organizations who combat childhood obesity, malnourishment, and physical inactivity; prevent food waste; educate consumers on healthy, nutritious food choices; create networks of social entrepreneurs; protect food and restaurant workers; highlight solutions for restoring the health of people and the planet; work with indigenous communities to preserve traditions, culture, and biodiversity; inspire and educate individuals to cook more of their own food; and protect public health, human health, and the environment.
“Food Tank is delighted to collaborate on this effort with the James Beard Foundation—we’re thrilled to highlight so many great organizations who are working to educate, inspire, and cultivate a better food system,” says Danielle Nierenberg, President of Food Tank.

Climate Change March September 21

Climate March Organizers See Surge of Momentum for People’s Climate March; Over 100,000 expected  September 21
New York City — Over 1,000,000 flyers have been handed out across New York City in the last five days. Hundreds of volunteers are canvassing subway stations across the city. 496 buses are coming in from nearly all 50 states. More than 32 marching bands are ready to play. It’s official: the People’s Climate March is going to be big.
If the weather holds, over 100,000 people are expected to attend demonstration on Sunday to demand bold action on climate change. Police have blocked off traffic on Central Park West from 59th St. to 86th street to accommodate the tens of thousands of students, workers, parents, scientists, beekeepers, and more who are joining the march.

Beginning at 10:30am, different groups taking part in the march will host small rallies up and down the march route to fire up their contingents or deliver public statements. At 11:00am labor unions will host a rally with thousands of members just south of Columbus Circle on Broadway.
The march will begin at 11:30 a.m. at Columbus Circle, head east on 59th Street, then south on 6th Ave, west on 42nd Street, and finish at 11th Avenue and West 34th Street. The front of the march is expected to reach the end of the route at about 2:00pm.
At 1:00pm, after a moment of silence to honor those impacted by climate change and the fossil fuel industry, the march will “Sound the Climate Alarm” with drums, trumpets, vuvuzelas, and over 20 marching bands. Churches across the city will ring their bells, as Jewish temples blow their shofars, as part of this global climate chorus calling for action.

This is Your Life In, On and Under Water


Read This, Feel Better, 

"My grandfather would go there, and so shall we."
- Celine Cousteau, from the Foreword of Blue Mind


Blue Mind
The Surprising Science That Shows How Being Near, In, On, or Under Water Can Make You Happier, Healthier, More Connected and Better at What You Do


A landmark book by marine biologist Wallace "J." Nichols on the remarkable effects of water on our health and well-being.


"Why are we drawn to the ocean each summer? Why does being near water set our minds and bodies at ease? In BLUE MIND, Wallace J. Nichols revolutionizes how we think about these questions, revealing the remarkable truth about the benefits of being in, on, under, or simply near water. Combining cutting-edge neuroscience with compelling personal stories from top athletes, leading scientists, military veterans, and gifted artists, he shows how proximity to water can improve performance, increase calm, diminish anxiety, and increase professional success.
BLUE MIND not only illustrates the crucial importance of our connection to water-it provides a paradigm shifting "blueprint" for a better life on this Blue Marble we call home."
(Little, Brown & Company, 2014)


"Can simply being near the ocean wash away stress?"

Engaging the Next Generation Jewell Style

If Americans are going to continue to lead healthy lifestyles, and have healthy lands and a healthy economy, one of the steps we must take is to bridge the growing divide between young people and nature, according to Sally Jewell, US Secretary of the Interior. 

 The Department of the Interior is establishing specific goals as manager of America’s national parks, refuges and other public lands, and will meet  with businesses, conservation organizations, tribes, youth corps and partners just like you.

"One of the best investments we can make in the future of our country is in our young people."

 Yeah Sally!


Sally Jewell and The Department of the Interior make a few encouraging plans!